Your Story Matters: Own It

Brené, August '09"Owning our story and loving ourselves through that process is the bravest thing we'll ever do."  --Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW

This week I'm celebrating the release of Brené's new DVD, The Hustle for Worthiness: Exploring the Power of Love, Belonging, and Being Enough, with her.  Watching Brené's work develop is like watching a master archer at target practice--she is increasingly hitting the mark on truths that are more and more central to our lives.

This talk holds so many insights that you will want to completely rearrange around, you will want to watch it over again and let the power of what she is finding and saying sink in deeply.  Then you'll want all your favorite people to watch it, too, so they can join you in this conversation.

To celebrate the release, we're giving away a copy of The Hustle for Worthiness to a commenter on this post.  You have until midnight, Friday, March 12th to enter.  Just leave this comment: "My story matters because I matter."  Go ahead--you can own it.

And the winner is (selected with the help of random.org) . . . Jane from New Zealand!  Congratulations, Jane--email me your shipping address at jen at jenlee dot net and we'll get your copy of The Hustle for Worthiness on its way.

To Tell

Colleen and Lucy in Central Park

"Most writers, like most children, need to tell. The only problem is that much of what they need to tell will provoke the ire of parent-critics, who are determined to tell writer-children what they can and cannot say.  Unless you have sufficient ego and feel entitled to tell your story, you will be stymied in your effort to create. You think you can't write, but the truth is you can't tell. Writing is nothing if not breaking the silence."

--Betsy Lerner, The Forest for the Trees: An Editor's Advice to Writers

Wallflowers at the Dance

 

Photo: Russian woman at Brighton Beach, Diana+

Here's a quote for the weekend:

"By and large, human beings have become wallflowers at the dance of nature.  In most instances, we feel exactly the same wistful longings but fearful inability to be ourselves, do what we want to do, be what we can be, that most wallflowers feel at dances.  Most of us are watchers, not dancers. We are not living, but fearfully maintaining our secure but deadened existence. We watch life on television or, just as unsatisfyingly, we watch life among others instead of living it ourselves. We watch life literally, not just metaphorically. It has become our politics, our sexuality, our morality, our spirituality.  We watch and vicariously pretend to be."

--The Art of Intimacy, Thomas Patrick Malone, M.D., and Patrick Thomas Malone, M.D.